Ken Boddie’s Where We Live holiday special

KOIN 6 News anchor Ken Boddie highlights features in our area

KOIN 6 News anchor Ken Boddie, November 21, 2017 (KOIN)
KOIN 6 News anchor Ken Boddie, November 21, 2017 (KOIN)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Each week, KOIN 6 News anchor Ken Boddie highlights a feature in our area that makes the Portland metro area such a great place to be. Here are a few of his recent Where We Live episodes.

‘Portland’s Postcard,’ the White Stag Sign
The Portland sign is a National Historic Landmark and a symbol of the Rose City. But the sign at the west end of the Burnside Bridge hasn’t always had Portland’s name in lights.

Dragon Boat Races
Dragon boat racing teams are out on the Willamette River practicing for one of the most popular events of the Portland Rose Festival. Dragon boats are a historic part of the festival and a colorful part of where we live.

Inversion: Plus Minus
If you’re on the east side of Portland and travel downtown by the Morrison or Hawthorne Bridge, you’ll probably see the huge steel sculptures that look like abandoned skeletons of old buildings.

Portland’s WW2 internment facility
Aya Fujii and Taka Mizote were just teenagers in 1942 when their lives were turned upside down.

Alpenrose Velodrome
Frans Pauwels convinced Alpenrose Dairy to build a dirt track, the predecessor to today’s track. It was a hit, so Pauwels went to Alpenrose again, getting $30,000 to build the Olympic-style velodrome.

Glenn Jackson, King of the Road
Thousands of Portlanders cross the I-205 bridge between Oregon and Washington every day. It’s named for Glenn Jackson, a man called “Mr. Oregon.”

Who was former Governor Tom McCall?
The colorful politician served as governor from 1967 to 1975. He was famous for telling the rest of the country to visit Oregon, but not to stay.

Pittock Mansion
High above downtown, in Portland’s west hills, sits Pittock Mansion, the 23-room house that was once home to one of Portland’s most prominent families.

The John McLoughlin House
Most of us have traveled McLoughlin Boulevard between Portland and Oregon City. It’s named for the founder of Oregon City and the man many call the father of Oregon.

Who was Bill Naito?
Bill Naito and his brother Sam built an empire in what is now Portland’s Old Town. From the 1960’s through the 1980’s, they bought and renovated more than 20 historic buildings, including Import Plaza, The Galleria (where City Target is now), Albers Mill and Montgomery Park.

Vancouver’s Esther Short Park
Short, part Native American and a mother of 12, Esther Short came to what is now Vancouver from Pennsylvania in the early 1800s.

George Washington, founder of Centralia
George Washington is an African American pioneer who founded a well-known city 90 miles north of Portland. That city is Centralia.

Lake Oswego unveils 15 new pieces of art
The art installment features more than 70 public sculptures all over downtown Lake Oswego. Forty are permanent, but the other 30 are rotated out and replaced every 2 years.

Visual Artist Julian Wilde
Portland is known for its creative talent, and one of the most creative visual artists around is helping to give the city a world-class reputation. His name is Julian Wilde, and his wild vision is a big part of where we live.