Eclipse is over, so what to do with your glasses now?

Oregon was the 1st state to see the eclipse Monday

Hundreds of people gathered at Tom McCall Waterfront Park in downtown Portland for the solar eclipse, August 21, 2017 (KOIN)
Hundreds of people gathered at Tom McCall Waterfront Park in downtown Portland for the solar eclipse, August 21, 2017 (KOIN)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — The first total solar eclipse to sweep across the country from coast to coast in nearly a century has come to end.

Totality lasted for just over 2 minutes in some parts of the state on Monday and upwards of 1 million people traveled to Oregon just for the event.

But now that the eclipse is over, what are you supposed to do with your glasses?

You can keep them for the next eclipse, which is slated for 2024 or you can recycle them.

Follow these steps to properly recycle your eclipse glasses:

  • Remove the protective solar-filter lenses before tossing the paper frames into the recycling bin
  • If the frames are paper or cardboard, they’re likely acceptable with other paper recyclables
  • Toss out the solar-filter lenses or contact a camera store to see if they recycle that type of film
  • Throw away unwanted plastic frames
  • Questions? Contact your local recycling center

Eye pain, light sensitivity and other noticeable changes to vision can begin immediately, several hours or even days after viewing the eclipse without proper solar eclipse glasses.

Anyone experiencing eye discomfort after viewing the eclipse should make an appointment to get their eyes checked out.