Will weather cooperate for viewing solar eclipse?

Total solar eclipse will happen August 21

An annular solar eclipse is seen from downtown Denver as the sun sets behind the Rocky Mountains in May 2012. (David Zalubowski/AP)
An annular solar eclipse is seen from downtown Denver as the sun sets behind the Rocky Mountains in May 2012. (David Zalubowski/AP)

(CBS) — On Aug. 21, the moon’s shadow will race across the United States in a 70-mile-wide corridor stretching from Oregon to South Carolina. Tens of millions hope to view the coast-to-coast solar eclipse somewhere along the narrow path of totality, while the rest of the nation will experience a partial eclipse. But actually getting to see this rare phenomenon will all come down to the weather and how much cloud cover is present at any given site.

William Harwood of CBS News looks at the historical data to try and determine where the best place to see the eclipse will be. (Hint: You’re already in a great spot.)

Will weather cooperate for viewing the August 21 solar eclipse?