It’s too hot to leave your pet in the car

High temperatures expected this weekend

Dog "Mo" sits on the front seat of a car with his owner at a supermarket parking in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Temperatures are expected to soar this weekend in the metro area and that means it’s too hot to leave your pets in the car, even for a short time.

This Feb. 26, 2011 photo shows a dog getting a cooling shower at the Sepulveda Dog Park in the Van Nuys section of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

The inside of a car heats up to dangerous temperatures in minutes. On an 85-degree day, a car’s interior temperature can climb to 120 degrees in 20 minutes, even with the windows slightly open.

Hot pavement can also hurt paws. Officials recommend taking pets outdoors in the morning and in the evening.

The Oregon Humane Society has more tips here. 

DoveLewis provided these tips for keeping animals safe in extreme temperatures:

• Never leave your pet in a car. On a mild to hot day, temperatures in a closed car (even with the windows cracked) can exceed 120 degrees in minutes, creating a dangerous condition for any animal.

• Give your pet extra water. Staying hydrated is crucial on hot days to avoid illness. Whether your pet is indoors or outdoors, be sure to fill their water bowls several times a day.

• Don’t overdo outdoor exercise. Often times, dogs don’t know when they need a break, so it’s important to stop frequently for shaded breaks and offer plenty of water.

• Take extra precaution with older dogs and dogs with shorter noses. Just like older humans, older dogs can be especially susceptible to higher temperatures. And certain breeds with shorter noses (like pugs and bulldogs) are at a greater risk of heatstroke.

• Apply pet-safe sunscreen to your dog. Sunburn can affect pets the same way it affects humans – pain, peeling and skin cancer. Use a pet-safe sunscreen on unprotected areas, like the tips of the ears, the skin around the lips, and the tip of the nose. A good rule of thumb for sunscreen: If it’s safe for babies, it’s safe for your pets.

• When in doubt, stay indoors. Avoid staying outside for long periods of time during the hottest time of the day, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Animals can get sick quickly on hot days, even if they are in the shade.

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