BPA drops plan for Oregon-Washington transmission line

80-mile-long, 500-kilovolt line would have run from Castle Rock, to Troutdale

The Bonneville Power Administration says the power system's capacity is dwindling, and soon it won't be able to handle all the demand, November 2015 (KOIN)
The Bonneville Power Administration says the power system's capacity is dwindling, and soon it won't be able to handle all the demand, November 2015 (KOIN)

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) – The Bonneville Power Administration has scrapped its controversial plan to build a high-voltage transmission line near Portland.

BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer announced the decision Thursday, citing the increasing cost and other factors.

The 80-mile-long, 500-kilovolt line would have run from Castle Rock, Washington, to Troutdale, Oregon.

The BPA said the line, first announced in 2009, was necessary to help meet growing demand for power in the Northwest.

Mainzer said Bonneville now believes it can meet demand without building the line.

The plan had long been unpopular with property owners along the route. They worried about their health and property values.

BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer signs a letter to the region explaining his decision to not build the I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project, May 18, 2017 (Courtesy: BPA)
BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer signs a letter to the region explaining his decision to not build the I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project, May 18, 2017 (Courtesy: BPA)