Dry weather lets ODOT crews fill potholes

It takes crews about 15 minutes to fill a normal-sized pothole

Washington County road crews fill potholes along Murray Boulevard in Beaverton, February 17, 2017 (KOIN)
Washington County road crews fill potholes along Murray Boulevard in Beaverton, February 17, 2017 (KOIN)


BEAVERTON, Ore. (KOIN) — With the sun finally shining Friday, area road crews are scrambling to fill as many potholes as they can.

It takes crews about 15 minutes to fill a normal-sized pothole because they have to be cleaned, make sure they’re dry and them compact them.

The rain will wash a pothole out as soon as it’s filled, so road crews need dry days to fill ’em up.

Along one stretch of Murray Boulevard in Beaverton Friday, crews worked to fill as many as 40 potholes. The city maintains 222 miles of road. A spokesperson from the mayor’s office said once the temperature stays at least 50 degrees consistently, they will be able to permanently fix the potholes.

This year’s freeze-and-thaw cycle has been especially brutal and caused thousands of potholes to pop up in the area. Although chains and studded tires don’t cause potholes to initially form, ODOT’s Don Hamilton said those traction devices can rip them apart faster or create larger holes.

Last winter was mild, so road crews had plenty of supplies on hand to deal with this year’s crop of potholes. But the recent stretch of rain has slowed their progress in filling them.

“Part of the problem is we need a good stretch of dry weather to be able to start, patch the potholes, and weather is not really cooperating with that either,” Hamilton told KOIN 6 News. “It’s been pretty wet in the recent weeks.”