Local Muslim family fears future under Trump

Ahmed Ali came to America in 2014 after a 7 year approval process

Ahmed Ali came to Oregon from Iraq in 2014 after 7 years of waiting for security clearance and approval to leave the war torn Middle East. (KOIN)
Ahmed Ali came to Oregon from Iraq in 2014 after 7 years of waiting for security clearance and approval to leave the war torn Middle East. (KOIN)


BEAVERTON, Ore. (KOIN) — President Donald Trump signed a 2 new executive orders at the Pentagon Friday, one to implement extreme vetting of Muslim refugees from war-torn countries.

“I’m establishing new vetting measures to keep radical Islamic terrorists out of the united states of america,” Trump said. “We don’t want ’em here.”

This executive order would make it nearly impossible for Muslim immigrants to make their way to the United States if their country is in a time of war. The draft of the order called for suspension of issuing visas to people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for at least 30 days.

A Beaverton family who came from one of those counties is now left worried about the future with these “vetting measures.”

Trump signs ‘new vetting measures’ to guard against terror

Ahmed Ali, who brought his family to Oregon from Iraq in 2014, said Trump’s order is hard to accept. He feels that this will divide America rather than make it great.

“I don’t know what will happen to my family. To my wife. To my kids,” Ali said.

Ali said even before Trump became president, it took his family 7 years to get approval and security clearance to move to the US. But he feels Trump is taking that process to an unnecessary extreme.

“I moved inside my country 9 times just looking for a safe place,” Ali said. “But after all this I couldn’t handle it anymore so I moved to the United States.”

Ali said he knows others who went through years of waiting and multiple security checks to make their way out of Iraq.

He also worries about members of his family who are still in Iraq and if he’ll ever be able to see them again.

“[My wife’s] dad is dying. I told her you cannot [go] because if you go to visit him, maybe they don’t allow you to come back even though you have a green card.”

Now the Ali family will just take things one day at a time.

“I left everything behind just looking for safety and now I have another safety issue,” Ali said. “So what can I do right now?”

Ahmed Ali's children, who live in Beaverton after immigrating from Iraq in 2014. (KOIN)
Ahmed Ali’s children, who live in Beaverton after immigrating from Iraq in 2014. (KOIN)