Some question Pendleton’s marijuana odor ordinance

The Pendleton City Council in June passed an ordinance prohibiting "unreasonable" amounts of marijuana odors

In this Feb. 17, 2016 photo, plants grow at the home of Jeremy Nickle, in his backyard in Honolulu, Hawaii. Nickel, who owns Hawaiian Holy Smokes and is applying for a dispensary, grows a variety of strains and has a medical marijuana card. Those wanting to open medical marijuana dispensaries in Hawaii face unique obstacles in a state of islands separated by federal waters. (AP Photo/Marina Riker)
In this Feb. 17, 2016 photo, plants grow at the home of Jeremy Nickle, in his backyard in Honolulu, Hawaii. Nickel, who owns Hawaiian Holy Smokes and is applying for a dispensary, grows a variety of strains and has a medical marijuana card. Those wanting to open medical marijuana dispensaries in Hawaii face unique obstacles in a state of islands separated by federal waters. (AP Photo/Marina Riker)

PENDLETON, Ore. (AP) – City officials say Pendleton’s marijuana odor ordinance is necessary, but some residents say the law is bound to bring trouble.

The East Oregonian reports that the Pendleton City Council in June passed an ordinance prohibiting “unreasonable” amounts of marijuana odors from leaving a property and entering another.

Pendleton attorney Will Perkinson says the ordinance is too vague and it doesn’t distinguish between medical and recreational marijuana or properly establish the level of odor a marijuana smell would need to reach to be considered harmful.

Since the odor law went into effect, there have been two cases where it has been enforced.

The City Council has not reconsidered the ordinance, but the planning commission is set to consider zoning regulations for marijuana retailers at a meeting Thursday.