Hundreds expected for hearing on coal-export terminal

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is taking comments on its draft environmental review of the project at a public hearing in Longview

File - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mining dumper truck hauls coal at Cloud Peak Energy's Spring Creek strip mine near Decker, Mont. U.S. officials have approved a 117 million-ton expansion of a Montana coal mine after concluding that burning the fuel would have a minor impact on the nation’s overall greenhouse gas emissions.
Federal mining officials said in documents made public Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, that burning coal from the Spring Creek Mine would generate roughly 160 million tons of carbon dioxide over the next five years. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
File - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mining dumper truck hauls coal at Cloud Peak Energy's Spring Creek strip mine near Decker, Mont. U.S. officials have approved a 117 million-ton expansion of a Montana coal mine after concluding that burning the fuel would have a minor impact on the nation’s overall greenhouse gas emissions. Federal mining officials said in documents made public Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, that burning coal from the Spring Creek Mine would generate roughly 160 million tons of carbon dioxide over the next five years. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

LONGVIEW, Wash. (AP) – Hundreds of supporters and opponents are expected at a federal hearing Monday about a proposed coal-export terminal along the Columbia River in southwest Washington.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is taking comments on its draft environmental review of the project at a public hearing in Longview.

Millennium Bulk Terminals-Longview is proposing a project in Longview to handle up to 44 million metric tons of coal a year. Coal would arrive by train from Montana, Wyoming and other states to be stored and loaded on ships for export to Asia.

Company CEO Bill Chapman and other proponents are scheduled to speak at an afternoon rally.

Opponents worried about potential train accidents, increased vessel traffic and other issues say they’ll turn out in large numbers as well.

The state is also doing its own separate environmental review of the project.