Yes on 97: Comcast is censoring our ads

A September poll found support for the measure is leading by 60 percent to 30 percent

FILE - This Feb. 11, 2011 file photo shows the Comcast logo on one of the company's vehicles, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
FILE - This Feb. 11, 2011 file photo shows the Comcast logo on one of the company's vehicles, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Yes on 97, the group pushing for Measure 97 to become law, says Comcast is censoring its ads.

Measure 97 is a ballot initiative that Oregon voters will decide on in November. If it passes, it will raise the corporate minimum tax for companies that have more than $25 million in Oregon sales. The money would go toward schools, health care and senior services.

Yes on 97 is working to get the ballot initiative passed, but it claims that Comcast has censored the group’s ads. The telecommunications company refuses to run Yes on 97 ads that reference Comcast, the group claims.

As a result, Yes on 97 said its campaign was off the television airwaves for days.

In order to get back on the air, the group said it had to edit out any mention of Comcast in the ads.

“This is a clear and unprecedented act of censorship by Comcast. Voters deserve to know the truth about Comcast and other large corporations that have gotten away with paying close to nothing in Oregon taxes for years,” said Shamus Lynsky with the Oregon Consumer League.

Gov. Kate Brown said she supports Measure 97, and a September poll found support for the measure is leading by 60 percent to 30 percent.

[Editorial note: KOIN has reached out to Comcast for a statement, and this story will be updated when a response is received.]