Defendant Medenbach: ‘God going to destroy US’

Kenneth Medenbach is one of 7 people on trial in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge takeover

Defendant Kenneth Medenbach, who describes himself as "one of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers," spoke with KOIN 6 News on the first day of testimony in the trial, September 14, 2016 (KOIN)
Defendant Kenneth Medenbach, who describes himself as "one of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers," spoke with KOIN 6 News on the first day of testimony in the trial, September 14, 2016 (KOIN)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Defendant Kenneth Medenbach, who describes himself as “one of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers,” told KOIN 6 News he has no regrets and is willing to go to prison.

Medenbach is one of 7 defendants facing federal charges in the 41-day takeover of the refuge in Harney County. He was with them from the beginning on January 2, but was arrested January 15 when he took a pickup truck from the refuge and went to a grocery store.

Defendant Kenneth Medenbach, who describes himself as "one of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers," spoke with KOIN 6 News on the first day of testimony in the trial, September 14, 2016 (KOIN)
Defendant Kenneth Medenbach, who describes himself as “one of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers,” spoke with KOIN 6 News on the first day of testimony in the trial, September 14, 2016 (KOIN)

Along with the conspiracy charge, Medenbach also faces the unauthorized use of a motor vehicle.

Shortly after court on Wednesday — the first day of testimony that featured Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward — Medenbach sat on a park bench in downtown Portland and talked about the case and his beliefs. He is out on bail and is being housed in a furnished hotel during the trial.

His words

Medenbach, one of the few Oregon residents arrested, said he was first drawn to the case over the land issue involving Dwight Hammond and his son, Steve Hammond. They were convicted of burning property on federal land and sent to prison.

But a judge ruled they were not sentenced properly and ordered them to return to prison to finish their terms.

Kenneth Medenbach, one of the militia at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Jan. 3, 2016 (KOIN)
Kenneth Medenbach, one of the militia at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Jan. 3, 2016 (KOIN)

Medenbach said that is “cruel and unusual punishment” and he showed up for the protest through the streets of Burns on January 2.

But he also went to the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge that day and stayed there until he was arrested 2 weeks later.

“I’ve been at this for 21 years,” he told KOIN 6 News. He said he took some federal land back then and “made some idle threats about the militia helping me out” and landed in jail for a short time.

Marbury v Madison — Brittannica

Marbury v. Madison, legal case in which, on February 24, 1803, the U.S. Supreme Court first declared an act of Congress unconstitutional, thus establishing the doctrine of judicial review. The court’s opinion, written by Chief Justice John Marshall, is considered one of the foundations of U.S. constitutional law.

More on Marbury v Madison:

History.com
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Around that time, he said he learned about the 1803 Supreme Court decision, Marbury v Madison, and decided he wanted to overturn it.

“The federal government doesn’t have the power to interpret the Constitution,” he said. “I’m a Christian. The supreme law of the land is the Constitution and the Bible says we need to abide by the law.”

“The federal government,” he said, “doesn’t have the power to own land in the State of Oregon.”

“A hundred ranchers lost their land because of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge,” he said, and added he’s tired of the federal government “not obeying the Constitution.”

The original 13 colonies formed the union and entered as free, independent, sovereign states, he said.

“In 1776, America had it with Britain. We’re going through the same thing (now.)”

Beyond his interpretation of the Constitution are his religious beliefs.

Citing Genesis, he said “God told man to subdue the Earth, to make beneficial use of the land. That’s what God wants man to do.”

Medenbach spoke about “One world order,” he said, is “attempting to take the control of everybody.”

“Our country is going to be overrun by Syrian refugees that don’t obey the Constitution. They want to induce Sharia law. They’re not going to stop,” he said.

“If we don’t stop abortion, if we don’t stop same-sex marriage, God is going to destroy this nation.”

Defendant Kenneth Medenbach, who describes himself as "one of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers," spoke with KOIN 6 News on the first day of testimony in the trial, September 14, 2016 (KOIN)
Defendant Kenneth Medenbach, who describes himself as “one of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers,” spoke with KOIN 6 News on the first day of testimony in the trial, September 14, 2016 (KOIN)

“If we don’t stop abortion, if we don’t stop same-sex marriage, God is going to destroy this nation.”

 

He feels like he accomplished getting his message to a national audience and said no matter what it was worth it.

“Oh, yeah, it was worth it. I think we’re going to win.”

The trial is expected to last perhaps until Thanksgiving.

The US Constitution 

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