That day in Dallas: President Kennedy assassinated

Questions linger over who killed President Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963

President John F. Kennedy is seen riding in motorcade approximately one minute before he was shot in Dallas, Tx., on Nov. 22, 1963. In the car riding with Kennedy are Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, left, and her husband, Gov. John Connally of Texas. (AP Photo/Jim Altgens)
President John F. Kennedy is seen riding in motorcade approximately one minute before he was shot in Dallas, Tx., on Nov. 22, 1963. In the car riding with Kennedy are Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, left, and her husband, Gov. John Connally of Texas. (AP Photo/Jim Altgens)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — John F. Kennedy has now been dead longer than he lived. But questions still arise over who killed President Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963.

The 35th President of the United States was shot to death as he and his wife, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, rode in an open-top Lincoln through the streets of downtown Dallas. Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife were sitting in front of the Kennedys.

Shots rang out at 12:30 p.m. local time, mortally wounding the president and seriously injuring the governor. John F. Kennedy was 46.

Less than an hour later, Dallas police officer JD Tippit was shot to death by Lee Harvey Oswald, who was arrested about 30 minutes later inside a movie theater. He was arraigned the next day for the murders of President Kennedy and Tippit.

Then on November 24, Oswald was shot to death on live television by night club owner Jack Ruby as Oswald was being transferred from Dallas police headquarters. Ruby was arrested, tried and convicted but died in 1967 while awaiting a new trial.

History.com states: “The official Warren Commission report of 1964 concluded that neither Oswald nor Ruby were part of a larger conspiracy, either domestic or international, to assassinate President Kennedy. Despite its seemingly firm conclusions, the report failed to silence conspiracy theories surrounding the event, and in 1978 the House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded in a preliminary report that Kennedy was “probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy” that may have involved multiple shooters and organized crime. The committee’s findings, as with those of the Warren Commission, continue to be widely disputed.”

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