Family: UCC student shot in head, arms, knees

"She looks good this morning," trauma surgeon Dr. Scott Russi said

Julie Woodworth, 19, is in critical but stable condition at Sacred Heart Hospital. (Facebook)
Julie Woodworth, 19, is in critical but stable condition at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart. (Facebook)

ROSEBURG, Ore. (KOIN) — As the community mourns the loss of 9 people in a shooting at Umpqua Community College, several others remain hospitalized.

Although it will be a long road to recovery, doctors say they are hopeful they will all survive.

Three shooting victims remain in critical condition. The surviving victim with the most serious injuries is being treated at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center.

She has been identified as 19-year-old Julie Woodworth. Doctors say she’s in critical but stable condition.

Julie Woodworth, 19, is in critical but stable condition at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart. (Facebook)
Julie Woodworth, 19, is in critical but stable condition at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart. (Facebook)

“She looks good this morning,” trauma surgeon Dr. Scott Russi said. “I’m optimistic… Time will tell as we are able to wake her up, take her off the ventilator, get a better neurologic exam on her.”

Doctors said Woodworth underwent a craniectomy to relieve pressure on her head.

According to a message on her GoFundMe page, Woodworth was shot 10 times. Relatives told KOIN 6 News she was shot in her arms, knees and head.

She’s already undergone multiple surgeries and doctors say they will have to do more.

“I thought she was dying when I got there.”

Cheyene Clark rushed to PeaceHealth when she found out her best friend was shot by the UCC gunman.

“It just sucks because she was going to school to make herself a better person, and someone’s trying to take that away from her,” Clark told KOIN 6 News.

Clark said Woodworth was only taking one class this semester, to ease her way into school. It was her first year at UCC and her first week of class.

Road to recovery

It’s been an exhausting 24 hours for the medical staff working on 3 patients, all women ages 18-34, at Sacred Heart Hospital.

“You focus on the job in these mass casualty situations,” Dr. Russi said. “It bothers me when I get home. I got home and cried, it doesn’t make sense to me. I don’t understand it.”

According to Dr. Russi, it could be anywhere from 1-5 weeks until the women are released from Sacred Heart Hospital.

Comments are closed.