Programs designed to tackle teen pregnancy issue

$6.25 million in grant money will be given out annually over 5 years

A pregnant woman (MGN Online, file)
A pregnant woman (MGN Online, file)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Recent statistics show minority populations are 2 to 3 times more likely to have a teen pregnancy. But new federal grant money has been awarded to Multnomah County to help address the issue.

Amber Boydston of the Boys & Girls Club of Portland, July 13, 2015 (KOIN)
Amber Boydston of the Boys & Girls Club of Portland, July 13, 2015 (KOIN)

Amber Boydston with the Boys & Girls Club of Portland said a lack of education and access to information, less money, support systems and cultural differences are among the reasons for a higher rate of teen pregnancies  in minorities.

“We have black and brown families who are working full-time or part-time jobs at a higher rate than our white families so by nature their children are coming from homes where there are not one or 2 parents there to support them,” Boydston told KOIN 6 News.

The $6.25 million in grant money will be given out annually to Multnomah County for the next 5 years, at a rate of $1.25 million each year. The money will be used for programs to help prevent minority teen pregnancy and educate young girls about sex.

The implementation of this grant money and the programs that will use it are still in the beginning phases.

Inside the Boys & Girls Club of Portland, July 13, 2015 (KOIN)
Inside the Boys & Girls Club of Portland, July 13, 2015 (KOIN)

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