Dry and hot doesn’t have to mean parched, brown

Succulents - also known as fat plants -- have thick fleshy parts to retain water and do well in the heat

Manzanitas at XeraPlants in Southeast Portland, July 3, 2015 (KOIN)
Manzanitas at XeraPlants in Southeast Portland, July 3, 2015 (KOIN)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — The hot and dry conditions are an obvious fire danger. But they also turn lawns brown and wilt different vegetation.

If you’re looking for a climate-adapted plant or tree, you might want to look at Manzanita. It’s low maintenance and drought-resistant, said John Crain of Xera Plants in Southeast Portland.

Crain said the key to planting what needs little water is to focus on native species. Pacific Madrones, for instance, are very hardy once their roots get established.

Succulents – also known as fat plants — have thick fleshy parts to retain water and do well in the heat.

To be fire resistant, avoid trees with twigs and needles and avoid plants that have a lot of dry material inside, like Juniper.

Learn more: Fire-resistant plants for your home and landscape

Drought-resistant plants at XeraPlants in Southeast Portland, July 3, 2015 (KOIN)
Drought-resistant plants at XeraPlants in Southeast Portland, July 3, 2015 (KOIN)

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