Viewing tips for the Lyrid Meteor Shower

Clear skies on Wednesday night will give Oregonians a good chance to catch the meteor shower, especially if they head away from city lights

Lyrid Meteor Shower sequence (NASA)
Lyrid Meteor Shower sequence (NASA)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Relatively clear skies on Wednesday night will leave Oregonians with a view of the Lyrid Meteor shower, especially if they head away from city lights.

The Lyrid Meteor Shower occurs when the Earth passes through the dusty trail of Comet Thatcher, which causes a meteor shower- the Lyrids. It usually happens around the end of April, says Jim Todd, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) Director of Space Science Education.

The Lyrid shower's radiant rises as early as 10 p.m., but you'll likely see more meteors once it climbs much higher in the sky before dawn. Even then, don't expect to see more than a few per hour radiating from a point near the Lyra-Hercules border (Sky and Telescope)
The Lyrid shower’s radiant rises as early as 10 p.m., but you’ll likely see more meteors once it climbs much higher in the sky before dawn. Even then, don’t expect to see more than a few per hour radiating from a point near the Lyra-Hercules border (Sky and Telescope)

Viewers can expect to see around 10-20 meteors per hour, at the peak. The meteors will be visible starting around 10 p.m. and throughout the night, with more visible before dawn, however clouds are expected to roll into Portland around that time, so be sure to head out earlier.

Todd recommends dressing warmly, setting up a spot with a reclining chair or laying on the ground, and looking east.

If you can’t make it outside on Wednesday evening, a live feed of the shower is available here.

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