Oregon considers bill banning racial profiling

FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 photo, the Oregon Senate recites the Pledge of Allegiance prior to the 77th Oregon Legislature taking the oath of office in Salem, Ore. Don Ryan, AP Photo.
FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 photo, the Oregon Senate recites the Pledge of Allegiance prior to the 77th Oregon Legislature taking the oath of office in Salem, Ore. Don Ryan, AP Photo.

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon House lawmakers are considering legislation that defines and bans racial profiling by law enforcement agencies.

The measure was introduced in the wake of widespread protests touched off by the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer in Missouri.

A state House panel heard testimony on the measure Monday. It would also establish a system for people to file profiling-based complaints.

Additionally, the bill creates a task force that would propose a way to identify patterns of profiling in law enforcement agencies. The task force would identify methods to correct such patterns.

Bill supporters say it’s about strengthening trust between law enforcement officers and local communities.

They say previous efforts to define racial profiling died before making their way through the Legislature. They say the Missouri shooting death of Michael Brown is helping this year’s bill gain traction.

Comments are closed.