There’s ‘The Civil War’ and The Civil War

Sherman's March to the Sea happened Nov. 16, 1864

Oregon State quarterback Sean Mannion and Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota flank Gen. William T. Sherman (AP Photos, Library of Congress)
Oregon State quarterback Sean Mannion and Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota flank Gen. William T. Sherman (AP Photos, Library of Congress)

Editor’s Note: For 118 years, Oregon and Oregon State have faced each other in an intrastate football rivalry that leads to bragging rights for teams and fans. The game has come to be known as The Civil War.

But the real Civil War reached a turning point 150 years. Here’s a quick look at both.

CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) — Recent history in the rivalry game that dates to 1894 will be this year on the side of the No. 3 Ducks, who have won six straight in the series against their neighbors to the north.

But the Beavers have a history of pulling off big upsets at home, including a 35-27 victory over then-No. 7 Arizona State at Reser Stadium earlier this season.

The Civil War is tied for the fifth most-contested rivalry in football, and it’s the oldest west of the Rocky Mountains.

The game begins at 5 p.m. Sunday and will be televised on ESPN.

This Week in The Civil War: Battle of Franklin, Tennessee

Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood led his troops in pursuit of a Union army across Tennessee in the Civil War.

The two foes met up on Nov. 30, 1864, at Franklin, Tenn., near Nashville, where Union forces dug in along a defensive line just outside the community. Fierce fighting erupted as Hood led an assault on Union defensive positions.

Although two federal units crumpled, the Union positions largely held despite much bloodletting that left more than 8,000 troops wounded, dead or missing. The casualties hit especially hard at Hood’s forces, which withdrew bloodied and bruised after the Union victory.

Two weeks earlier

On Nov. 16, 1864, Gen. William T. Sherman watched his army pull out of Atlanta, and marched with 62,000 veteran troops to the Atlantic coast at Savannah, conquering territory and making a point to the enemy in what would be known as Sherman’s March to the Sea during the American Civil War.

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