Supermoon, meteor shower occur on same night

Supermoon, Perseid meteor shower visible on Aug. 10

A KOIN 6 viewer's photo of the supermoon taken from Sunrise City Park in Troutdale, August 10, 2014. (Report It/Jarrod Lyman)
A KOIN 6 viewer's photo of the supermoon taken from Sunrise City Park in Troutdale, August 10, 2014. (Report It/Jarrod Lyman)
A KOIN 6 viewer's photo of the supermoon over the Hood River through the smoke of the Rowena fire, August 10, 2014. (Report It/Laszlo Regos)
A KOIN 6 viewer’s photo of the supermoon over the Hood River through the smoke of the Rowena fire, August 10, 2014. (Report It/Laszlo Regos)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN 6) — This year’s second of three supermoons was paired with a meteor shower Sunday night.

The annual Perseid meteor shower peaked Sunday, Aug. 10 when the supermoon, also known as the perigee full Moon, will be as much as 14% closer and 30% brighter than other full Moons of the year, according to NASA. The first of 2014’s supermoons occurred on July 12.

Comet Swift Tuttle is the source of the Perseid meteor shower. According to NASA, the huge comet comes through the inner solar system every 133 years and “leaves behind a trail of dust and grit.”

When Earth passes through the debris zone, NASA says the specks of comet-stuff hit the atmosphere at 140,000 mph and disintegrate in flashes of light or meteors, which are called “Perseids because they fly out of the constellation Perseus.”

Due to the timing of this summer’s third supermoon, the Perseid meteor shower may have been less visible than it otherwise would have been.

Don’t worry if you didn’t get a chance to spot the second supermoon of the year. The last of the three will occur on Sept. 9.

Video from NASA.gov.

blog comments powered by Disqus