Lightning, wind challenge Oregon wildfire efforts

Crews to focus on sending teams in to new fires early, redeploying crews

In this Sunday July 13, 2014, photo released by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry, the Moccasin Hill fire burns north of Sprague River and northeast of Klamath Falls, Ore. Lightning struck Oregon more than 6,000 times Sunday and Monday, touching off small fires by the dozens. Such a barrage can be expected to cause numerous "sleeper" or holdover fires in coming days. (AP Photo/Oregon Dept. of Forestry, Dennis Lee)
In this Sunday July 13, 2014, photo released by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry, the Moccasin Hill fire burns north of Sprague River and northeast of Klamath Falls, Ore. Lightning struck Oregon more than 6,000 times Sunday and Monday, touching off small fires by the dozens. Such a barrage can be expected to cause numerous "sleeper" or holdover fires in coming days. (AP Photo/Oregon Dept. of Forestry, Dennis Lee)

SALEM, Ore. (KOIN 6) — As lightning continues throughout certain parts of Oregon, with storms forcasted into next week, crews across the state will continue to be busy with containment efforts.

The Oregon Department of Forestry is in the process of bringing in additional resources in protected forest land across the state. A priority for crews is to bring in firefighting efforts as soon as possible, to stamp out the fires and redeploy resources where they are most needed.

Once again, the department is reminding the public to be fire safe while recreating outdoors – that means obeying burn bans and refraining from smoking.

An update on major fires burning in Oregon (from the Oregon Department of Forestry)

The Murderers Creek and Buck Fork fires

As of Saturday, Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 4 assumed management of this complex. Approximate fire acreages for Murderers Creek, which merged with what began as a third fire, Placer Gulch, is 9,000 acres, while. Buck Fork is estimated at 80 acres and 80 percent contained.

Southwest Oregon District

The Beaver Complex consists of two fires: the Salt Creek Fire, 20 miles northwest of Medford, and the Oregon Gulch Fire, 15 miles east of Ashland in the proximity of the Soda Mountain Wilderness.

Friday, erratic and gusty winds on the Oregon Gulch Fire, which spans approximately 21,088 acres and is  5 % contained at this point, caused the fire to spread rapidly. It has consumed three homes, five building and multiple vehicles. Up to 270 structures in Oregon and California are threatened by the fire.

The Salt Creek Fire increased from 108 acres to 146 acres Saturday, and is 30% contained. Crews completed line construction around the fire’s perimeter.

A command structure, led by organizations including the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Oregon State Fire Marshall’s Office and Cal Fire has been established.

Haystack Complex

Mop up continues on the Haystack, Steet, and Hog Ridge fires. Crews anticipate meeting mop-up standards within the next 24 hours. Suppression work will continue following mop up.

  • The Haystack Fire, roughly three miles east of Spray, Oregon, has an estimated size of 1,155 acres.
  • The Throop Fire, located about three miles northeast of Dayville, is mapped at 490 acres
  • The Steet Fire located, seven miles northeast of Monument, is mapped at 50 acres. The Hog Ridge Fire, located nine miles northwest of Dayville, is mapped at 55 acres
  • The School House Fire, located six miles east of Monument, is mapped at 73 acres. Information on this complex:
  • Sniption Fire: 25,000 acres; 60 percent contained.

 

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