Still no decision on Lake Oswego apartment complex

Local developer wants to build 4-story, 300,000 square foot apartment complex in downtown Lake Oswego

Rendering of revised plan to build three four story buildings in downtown Lake Oswego that would contain apartments and retail space, July 24, 2014. (KOIN 6)
Rendering of revised plan to build three four story buildings in downtown Lake Oswego that would contain apartments and retail space, July 24, 2014. (KOIN 6)

LAKE OSWEGO, Ore. (KOIN 6) — The future of the Wizer block in the heart of downtown Lake Oswego was left up in the air after a council meeting Thursday night.

A local developer is hoping to transform the block where the old Wizer’s grocery store was located into an apartment complex.

Some 200 people attended a city council meeting Monday that was resumed Thursday evening to voice their opposition to the plan.

Rendering of the original Lake Oswego apartment complex plan that was turned down by the development commission, Feb. 21, 2014 (KOIN 6 News)
Rendering of the original Lake Oswego apartment complex plan that was turned down by the development commission, Feb. 21, 2014 (KOIN 6 News)

The developer, Patrick Kessi, submitted a revised plan to build three four-story buildings, which is a reduction in size from the original plan, which called for a five-story building.

Even with those changes, neighbors say this development simply isn’t compatible with neighboring building, which are smaller.

“They’re trying to break up the façade to give it the appearance of small scale structures, but in reality, each of these apartment buildings are the size of two-thirds of a football field,” said Gale Frank, who lives in Lake Oswego.

Lita Grigg with Save Our Village, a grassroots organization in Lake Oswego, said the plans will hurt decades of history with a high density apartment complex that looks like it belongs in Portland’s Pearl District.

“We are opposed to this because we are for development. Development is necessary, but this is definitely over development. This is not about market studies, focus groups or hired paid political consultants. This is about honoring our code,” said Grigg.

Kessi, on the other hand, said he believes this new building does abide by city code.

“It’s very compatible with neighbors. It’s very compatible on Second Street,” said Kessi. “We have tremendous support for the development, and the city staff has overwhelmingly approved the development.”

The city’s Development Review Commission is expected to make a decision on the matter next Wednesday, July 30.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s