Space Station sightings possible for Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN 6) — Two months ago, it was the “Blood Moon” lunar eclipse that had Portlanders gazing at the night sky. Look up at night this month and you may catch a glimpse of the International Space Station (ISS).

FILE - This April 22, 2014 file photo provided by NASA shows a photo of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft docked to the International Space Station and was photographed by one of two spacewalking astronauts. The International Space Station will be visible from Portland between June 2 and June 17, 2014. (AP Photo/NASA, File)
FILE – This April 22, 2014 file photo provided by NASA shows a photo of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft docked to the International Space Station and was photographed by one of two spacewalking astronauts. The International Space Station will be visible from Portland between June 2 and June 17, 2014. (AP Photo/NASA, File)

According to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI), several sighting opportunities of ISS for Portland will occur this week.

According to OMSI Director of Space Science Education Jim Todd, ISS will be visible to the naked eye – no optical aid needed – to Portlanders three nights this week.

Todd said it always amazes people when they are told that they can actually see the Space Station, orbiting at 17,500 mph above Earth, with their own two eyes.

To an unaided eye, Todd said ISS, which is as big as a football field, will appear as a very bright point of light generally traveling from west to east that does not twinkle and moving against the stars in the background.

The Space Station was seen over Portland skies at 10:02 p.m. Tuesday, appearing from SSW, overhead at 38 degrees SE and then disappeared in ENE.

Below are the other projected times that ISS will be visible this week:

  • Wednesday, June 4 at 10:50 pm, with ISS appearing from WSW, overhead at 61 degrees NNW and then disappears in ENE.
  • Friday, June 5 at 10:01 pm, with ISS appearing from WSW, visible at 90 degrees E and then disappears in ENE.

More sightings are possible through June 17, according to NASA’s website.

For more information about ISS sightings across the area, visit spaceflight.nasa.gov.

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