20 years in Ore. DA murder-for-hire plot

Dustin Kimbrough, 34, of The Dalles, Ore., was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, in a plot to kill a district attorney who had prosecuted him for burglary and identity theft. (Wasco County Jail)
Dustin Kimbrough, 34, of The Dalles, Ore., was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, in a plot to kill a district attorney who had prosecuted him for burglary and identity theft. (Wasco County Jail)

THE DALLES, Ore. (AP) — A man from The Dalles has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for a jailhouse plot to hire someone to kill the district attorney who had prosecuted him for burglary and identity theft.

The sentence was handed down Wednesday in the case of 34-year-old Dustin Kimbrough, The Dalles Chronicle reported.

Kimbrough was accused of attempted murder — plotting with a cellmate to find someone to kill his own father-in-law and brother-in-law, as well as Wasco County District Attorney Eric Nisley.

Prosecutors said Kimbrough offered $80,000, to be paid from valuables that could be stolen from the father-in-law and proceeds from the father-in-law’s life insurance policy.

The cellmate, 28-year-old Francis Crowley, testified against Kimbrough.

Kimbrough’s lawyer, Amy Margolis, said a letter making the offer was never delivered to a hit man, and there will be an appeal.

Margolis argued that Crowley told authorities of Kimbrough’s angry expressions in hopes of gaining some advantage. She said at his first meeting with sheriff’s deputies he presented a list of 21 other inmates that he was willing to provide information about in exchange for a deal of some kind.

The case was prosecuted by Bumjoon Park, a state senior assistant attorney general.

Nisley spoke at the sentencing and said Kimbrough’s plot caused fear and continuing stress for his family.

Park said Kimbrough reiterated his intentions in 53 notes exchanged with Crowley.

“The amount of thought, hate and malice toward these victims that was seething in his mind and heart … was pretty frightening,” said Park.

Kimbrough’s family said he suffered from drug addiction, and Nisley said Kimbrough had been put behind bars for possessing methamphetamine, a violation of his release from jail in the burglary case.

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Information from: The Dalles Chronicle, http://www.thedalleschronicle.com

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

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