Wireless defibrillators save time, lives

A Philips Heartstart debfibrillator transmits vital patient information wirelessly to the hospital before arriving. TVF&R deployed 46 of these devices on Aug. 27, 2013 (KOIN 6 News/Robert Dingwall)
A Philips Heartstart debfibrillator transmits vital patient information wirelessly to the hospital before arriving. TVF&R deployed 46 of these devices on Aug. 27, 2013 (KOIN 6 News/Robert Dingwall)

TUALATIN, Ore. (KOIN) — On May 5, Bob Archer took his dog for a walk in his Tualatin neighborhood. While he was on his walk he suffered a heart attack. He called 911 for an ambulance, and the first responders from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue used a wireless cardiac monitor that helped save his life.

TVF&R used a Philips Heartstart debfibrillator that transmits vital patient information wirelessly to the hospital before arriving.

“The national standard is we want to do what is called a door-to-balloon treatment in 90 minutes,” said EMS Battalion Chief Mark Charleston. “But in Bob’s case we did it in 51 minutes, so it probably saved about 40 minutes off his time.”

Bob Archer, left, shakes hands with the paramedics from TVF&R who saved his life when he was having a heart attack in May. (Aug. 27, 2013, KOIN 6 News/Robert Dingwall)

Bob Archer, left, shakes hands with the paramedics from TVF&R who saved his life when he was having a heart attack in May. (Aug. 27, 2013, KOIN 6 News/Robert Dingwall)

The device, about the size of a backpack, transmits everything from the patient’s heart condition to diagnostic criteria.

Now, TVF&R deployed 46 of these defibrillators that will be in fire engines, trucks and medical units.

On Tuesday, Archer met the paramedics who saved him in May.

“It’s good to meet these people, you know after the fact, and to hopefully show them the appreciation that I have,” he said. “I’m very, very grateful. I’m really appreciative.”

Though the defibrillators are now deployed, the transmitters will go live on Sept. 9.

 

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